MENU LOG IN CART {{currentCart.getItemCount()}}

Beauty

Where do you ship Beauty Products?
Descato.com ships Beauty Products to all the countries listed here, excluding Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Russian Federation.
Fragrance
1. Where should fragrance be stored?
The scent of a fragrance eventually changes and diminishes over time, but good care can extend their shelf life. Store fragrances in a cool and dry location away from sunlight and do not expose to extreme temperatures. Make sure opened fragrances are upright and tightly capped. Try to keep them in their boxes. 

2. Where should fragrance be applied?
Fragrance is usually applied to the wrist. Some people also like to dab fragrance on the neck and behind the ears, but these areas dry out quickly. Avoid applying fragrance onto jewelry and clothing as it may result in discoloration. 

3. What are the differences among Parfum, Eau de Parfum, Eau de Toilette, and Eau de Cologne? 
These names refer to the concentration of fragrant oils in the perfume i.e., how strong and long lasting the scent is. Parfum contains the highest percentage of oils and lasts the longest (around 5-7 hours). Accordingly, it is also the most expensive. Eau de Parfum (EDP) is a bit weaker and lasts up to around 5 hours. Eau de Toilette (EDT) contains a significantly smaller percentage of fragrant oils and has a light scent that lasts around 3 hours. Eau de Cologne (EDC) has the lowest concentration of oils and lasts around 1-2 hours. 

4. How can I make scents last longer?
For longer lasting scent, layer the fragrance by additionally using lotion, shower gel, powder, or other perfumes of the same scent.

5. What do the fragrance abbreviations mean?
EDT: Eau de Toilette   
B/L: Body Lotion   
EDP: Eau de Parfum   
B/P: Body Powder   
EDC: Eau de Cologne   
B/C: Body Cream   
Col: Cologne    
B/G: Bath Gel   
C/S: Cologne Spray   
Sp: Spray    
D/P: Dusting Powder   
P/S: Purse Spray   
Dust: Dusting   
A/S: After-Shave   
Conc: Concentrate
Makeup
1. What type of foundation should I get for my skin type? 
Dry skin types should use liquid or cream foundation.
Normal to dry skin types should use liquid or cream foundation.
Normal to oily skin types should use oil-free/oil-controlling liquid or powder. 
Oily skin types should use oil-free/oil-controlling liquid or powder with a matte finish. 


2. What is the shelf life of makeup items after they have been opened?

Though it's not listed on the container, makeup does have an "expiration date." Exposure to air, bacteria, and light causes makeup to deteriorate over time. Try to store makeup in a cool, dry, and dark location, and wash hands and brushes/puffs before use to minimize contamination. Other than being less effective, makeup past its shelf life can cause skin irritation and breakouts. Be especially careful about eye makeup, as eyes are more susceptible to infection. It is best to regularly clear out your cosmetics bag. If the item has an odor or has changed color/consistency, it is definitely time to dispose of it. 

Most beauty products should have a 3-year shelf life starting from their manufacturing date, and should be used within 1 year after being opened. Certain types of products may have a longer or shorter shelf life. Please refer to the specific product details or packaging for further information. 


3. What are the different cover makeup items for?
ItemUseWear
Makeup base
  • "Prepare" skin so that makeup holds longer and better
  • Even and smoothen skin
Under makeup
Foundation
  • Cover makeup in liquid, cream, or powder form in color matching skin tone
  • Even out skin tone, making skin look uniform and smooth
All over face or on areas where skin tone needs to be evened out
Pressed powder
  • Caked powder in compact form in color matching skin tone
  • Minimize appearances of pores and smoothen complexion
  • Set makeup
  • Touch-ups
Over foundation/concealer
Loose powder
  • Fine powder in translucent or color matching skin tone
  • Minimize appearances of pores and smoothen complexion
  • Set makeup and absorb excess oil for matte finish
  • Softer and more natural-looking than pressed powder, but less portable
Over foundation/concealer
Concealer
  • Cover/lighten blemishes, red spots, undereye circles, and other skin discolorations
On areas requiring extra coverage
Bronzer
  • Add bronze, sun-kissed glow to skin
Over makeup, usually on apples of cheeks or cheekbones
Skincare
1. What are the different skincare products for?
ItemUseRoutine
Cleanser/face wash
  • Remove makeup, oil, and dirt from skin
Daily
Toner
  • Restore skin to normal pH balance
  • Remove residual makeup, dirt, and calcium deposits from water
  • Condition, exfoliate, and seal skin
After cleansing; before moisturizer or treatment
Astringent
  • Control oil (contains more alcohol than toner)
  • Restore skin to normal pH balance
  • Remove residual makeup, dirt, and calcium deposits from water
  • Condition, exfoliate, and seal skin
After cleansing; before moisturizer or treatment
Moisturizer
  • Hydrate and soften skin
After cleansing; before makeup
Emollient
  • Soften and soothe skin
After cleansing
Exfoliant/Exfoliator
  • Remove dead skin cells so skin looks smoother and softer
Few times a week
Scrub
  • Cleanser with exfoliant
Few times a week
Serum/Essence
  • Concentrated treatment for specific skin issues (anti-aging, whitening, hydrating, etc.)
After cleansing
Eye cream/Eye gel/Eye essence
  • Smooth fine lines and prevent wrinkles
  • Reduce appearance of dark circles/puffiness
  • Hydrate and soften skin
Daily after cleansing
SunscreenSunblock
  • Protect skin from ultraviolet rays
  • Reduce risk of sunburn and skin damage
When outdoors
Mask
  • Concentrated treatment for specific skin issues (anti-aging, whitening, hydrating, etc.)
After cleansing, daily or few times a week

This chart serves merely as a guide for general use. Many brands offer combined products, and different products may have different functions and recommended usage. Read the product information and instructions for each item carefully before application. 


2. What are UVA and UVB? 
UVA and UVB are ultraviolet rays emitted by the sun that can cause damage to skin. Ultraviolet-A (UVA) are long-wave rays that penetrate deep into skin and cause aging effects such as wrinkles. Ultraviolet-B (UVB) are short-wave rays that cause tanning and sunburns. UVB is more directly linked to skin cancer, but UVA also has cancer-causing effects. 


3. What does SPF mean? And what SPF sunscreen should I use? 
SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor and it is a measure of how long a sunscreen protects against UVB rays. The higher the SPF, the greater the protection. Note, however, that the scale is not proportional: SPF 30 provides around 3% more protection than SPF 15, not twice as much. 

For normal daily activities, a sunscreen with an SPF of 15-25 is adequate. For those engaging in prolonged outdoor activities, such as swimming and hiking, a higher SPF is recommended. People who have more sensitive (easily sunburned) skin should also seek higher SPF products. Sunscreen should be applied at least 20 minutes before exposure to sun and reapplied every 2 hours and after swimming. Skin is at risk from UV rays even on cloudy days, so it is best to always wear sunscreen when outdoors. 


4. What is PA?
PA stands for protection grade. It is a measure used by Japanese skin care products to determine how well a sunscreen protects against UVA rays. There are 3 grades - PA+, PA++, and PA+++ - in that order of protection. PA++ is adequate for normal protection. PA+++ is recommended for extended sunlight exposure and sensitive skin types.